Uncategorized

Ten April Fool’s pranks of 2009

Friday, April 3, 2009 

April Fools’ Day pranks harmlessly pervaded worldwide again this year. Media outlets and internet sites have joined family, office workers, and friends to provide a wide variety of practical jokes. Ireland, France, and the United States celebrate April Fools all day, whereas a few countries celebrate jokes only until noon such as the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa.

Car and Driver claimed that GM and Chrysler were ordered out of NASCAR by the White House by the end of 2009 in order to receive any more government loans. There are press releases about this short-lived prank which received controversial feedback.

The Swiss Tourism Board has announced that volunteers were desperately needed, The Association of Mountain Cleaners “makes sure that our holiday guests can always enjoy perfect mountains. Using brooms, brushes, water and muscle power, they clean the rocks of any bird droppings.”

This year Gmail produced a new autopilot feature for April 1, 2009 which can read your email and automatically respond to every message.

BMW released its new Magnetic Tow Technology which allows your BMW to magnetically attach to the vehicle ahead of you. This enhanced technology allows the driver to remove their foot from the gas pedal and turn off the motor.

The Guardian proposed its move to Twitter, which would allow the newspaper to fit its article content into 140 character messages or “tweets”. Included in this venture was the archiving of past events reported by The Guardian, such as, “1927 OMG first successful transatlantic air flight wow, pretty cool! Boring day otherwise *sigh*”

Google’s technological break through for April Fool’s Day was CADIE, (Cognitive Autoheuristic Distributed-Intelligence Entity). By extracting internet search patterns combined with Brain Search, a part of CADIE technology, Google can now search your thoughts and memories.

Wikipedia even fooled Fox News who claimed that “every item on the home page of the user-generated site Wikipedia is fake. The featured Wikipedia article regaled the “Museum of Bad Art” in Boston.” However, each item on the main page was based on reality — even news articles such as NASA reports a shower of diamonds over the Republic of Sudan, which was based on a meteorite which passed over Sudan whose fragments did reveal diamonds upon discovery.

The Conficker Internet worm had been in the news warning of a worst case scenario when computers worldwide would be affected by the virus. Even the chief security adviser for Microsoft, Ed Gibson, didn’t want to make any predictions about what would happen. Experts just knew that it was set to go off on April 1. Several anomalous happenings were attributed to Conficker including Leroy “Mac” MacElrie who claimed to be the programmer of the Conficker worm and turned himself in to police.

Hotels.com ran an advertisement offering hotel room bookings on the moon which would be offered on European websites starting at £800 a night.

Qualcomm ingeniously revealed a new wireless networking technology called wireless convergence. Making use of the flight patterns of pigeons. They then use innovative solutions to converge the birds with wolves to protect the internal improvements.

Media outlets were not the only ones pulling pranks. Gaming websites across the internet Blizzard, Joystiq, and affiliates posted reviews and announcements of games with tongue in cheek. YouTube offered viewers a unique April Fool’s experience as videos were offered upside down. In Ireland, U2 fans received a U2opia concert on a shopping centre roof top concert rather than the real thing.

Uncategorized

Ten April Fool’s pranks of 2009

Friday, April 3, 2009 

April Fools’ Day pranks harmlessly pervaded worldwide again this year. Media outlets and internet sites have joined family, office workers, and friends to provide a wide variety of practical jokes. Ireland, France, and the United States celebrate April Fools all day, whereas a few countries celebrate jokes only until noon such as the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa.

Car and Driver claimed that GM and Chrysler were ordered out of NASCAR by the White House by the end of 2009 in order to receive any more government loans. There are press releases about this short-lived prank which received controversial feedback.

The Swiss Tourism Board has announced that volunteers were desperately needed, The Association of Mountain Cleaners “makes sure that our holiday guests can always enjoy perfect mountains. Using brooms, brushes, water and muscle power, they clean the rocks of any bird droppings.”

This year Gmail produced a new autopilot feature for April 1, 2009 which can read your email and automatically respond to every message.

BMW released its new Magnetic Tow Technology which allows your BMW to magnetically attach to the vehicle ahead of you. This enhanced technology allows the driver to remove their foot from the gas pedal and turn off the motor.

The Guardian proposed its move to Twitter, which would allow the newspaper to fit its article content into 140 character messages or “tweets”. Included in this venture was the archiving of past events reported by The Guardian, such as, “1927 OMG first successful transatlantic air flight wow, pretty cool! Boring day otherwise *sigh*”

Google’s technological break through for April Fool’s Day was CADIE, (Cognitive Autoheuristic Distributed-Intelligence Entity). By extracting internet search patterns combined with Brain Search, a part of CADIE technology, Google can now search your thoughts and memories.

Wikipedia even fooled Fox News who claimed that “every item on the home page of the user-generated site Wikipedia is fake. The featured Wikipedia article regaled the “Museum of Bad Art” in Boston.” However, each item on the main page was based on reality — even news articles such as NASA reports a shower of diamonds over the Republic of Sudan, which was based on a meteorite which passed over Sudan whose fragments did reveal diamonds upon discovery.

The Conficker Internet worm had been in the news warning of a worst case scenario when computers worldwide would be affected by the virus. Even the chief security adviser for Microsoft, Ed Gibson, didn’t want to make any predictions about what would happen. Experts just knew that it was set to go off on April 1. Several anomalous happenings were attributed to Conficker including Leroy “Mac” MacElrie who claimed to be the programmer of the Conficker worm and turned himself in to police.

Hotels.com ran an advertisement offering hotel room bookings on the moon which would be offered on European websites starting at £800 a night.

Qualcomm ingeniously revealed a new wireless networking technology called wireless convergence. Making use of the flight patterns of pigeons. They then use innovative solutions to converge the birds with wolves to protect the internal improvements.

Media outlets were not the only ones pulling pranks. Gaming websites across the internet Blizzard, Joystiq, and affiliates posted reviews and announcements of games with tongue in cheek. YouTube offered viewers a unique April Fool’s experience as videos were offered upside down. In Ireland, U2 fans received a U2opia concert on a shopping centre roof top concert rather than the real thing.

Legal

Limited Company Memorandum Of Association

By Terry Cartwright

A new limited liability company must submit a Memorandum of Association with the Companies House company registration forms. It is an essential feature when forming a company. Failing to submit a Memorandum of Association in the correct format would result in the company registration being declined.

The Memorandum of Association must state:

1. The name of the company with limited as the last word unless specific dispensation has been obtained to dispense with the word limited on the grounds of the company being formed for any of the objects specified or the liability of the members is unlimited. Before forming a company a name check should be carried out to ensure the proposed new limited liability company name is suitable and not too similar to an existing name.

2. The memorandum must state whether the registered office of the company is situated in England and Wales or in Scotland. The registered office of the company is where official documents such as Company House communications, notices, writs and summonses may be sent.

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3. The objects of the company must be stated. The objects comprise of a main objects clause and a number of other clauses governing the activities of the company. Section 3A of the Companies Act 1985 permits the use of a shortened form of the objects clause which many newly registered companies adopt. Composing an extended main objects clause takes research and great care to ensure it is all embracing within the industry and related activities of the company to avoid the possibility that the company may do business outside its stated objectives. The objects clause should also include all the activities a company may engage in to enable the main objects of the company to be carried out.

4. The Memorandum of Association must include a statement that the liability of the members is limited.

5. A limited liability company that is limited by shares must also state the amount of share capital the company proposes and the division of those shares into fixed amounts. For example, the share capital of the company is 1,000 pounds divided into 1,000 shares of 1 pound each.

6. The Memorandum of Association must also contain a clause regarding the subscription of the initial members of the company. This clause must state the name of each member, their address and description. A minimum of two members are required to register a new private company, the number of shares each subscriber is subscribing to and each subscriber should also sign the memorandum under their allocated shares.

7. The signatures of the subscribers to the Memorandum of Association must also be witnessed by a third party. No special qualifications are required by the third party witness except that the third party must be able to sign on the basis that the document has been signed by the subscribers who are who they say they are.

Whenever a new company is formed in the UK a Memorandum of Association must be supplied with the company formation documents that include Companies House forms 10 and 12 and the Articles of Association. Companies House forms 10 and 12 can be obtained from many sources include Companies House free of charge. In addition most newly formed companies who submit the details for company registration also adopt a standard set of Articles of Association, called Table A. Technically Companies house do not require a copy of Table A to be submitted to them with the company registration if Table A is to be adopted. If the Articles of Association are not submitted then the company registration documents must include a letter advising Companies House that the new limited liability company wishes to adopt the standard Table A, Articles of Association as required under the appropriate Company Law un-amended.

Following the limited company formation a company may change the main objects clause of the Memorandum of Association by passing a special resolution that has to be approved by the members at an extraordinary general meeting. Details of the special resolution and a copy of the new Memorandum of Association are required to be registered with Companies House.

About the Author: Terry Cartwright designs Payroll and Accounting Software

diyaccounting.co.uk

with UK payroll software for 1 to 20 employees at

diyaccounting.co.uk/payroll.htm

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=218790&ca=Business

Uncategorized

Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence “Larry” Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic and political activist. He is a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark, and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications, and he has called for state-based activism to promote substantive reform of government with a Second Constitutional Convention.[1] In May 2014, he launched a crowd-funded political action committee which he termed Mayday PAC with the purpose of electing candidates to Congress who would pass campaign finance reform.[2]

Lessig is director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and a professor of law at Harvard Law School. Previously, he was a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of the Center for Internet and Society. Lessig is a founding board member of Creative Commons and the founder of Rootstrikers, and is on the board of MapLight.[3] He is on the advisory boards of the Democracy Café,[4] Sunlight Foundation[5] and Americans Elect.[6] He is a former board member of the Free Software Foundation, Software Freedom Law Center and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.[7]

Born in Rapid City, South Dakota, Lessig grew up in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and earned a B.A. in Economics and a B.S. in Management (Wharton School) from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Cambridge (Trinity) in England, and a Juris Doctor from Yale Law School in 1989. After graduating from law school, he clerked for a year for Judge Richard Posner, at the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, Illinois, and another year for Justice Antonin Scalia at the Supreme Court.[8]

Lessig started his academic career at the University of Chicago Law School, where he was Professor from 1991 to 1997. From 1997 to 2000, he was at Harvard Law School, holding for a year the chair of Berkman Professor of Law, affiliated with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.[8] He subsequently joined Stanford Law School, where he established the school’s Center for Internet and Society.[9]

Lessig returned to Harvard in December 2008 as Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.[10] In 2013, Lessig was appointed as the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership; his chair lecture was titled “Aaron’s Laws: Law and Justice in a Digital Age.”[11][12] In 2013, Lessig was also awarded an honorary doctorate by the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lund University, Sweden.[13]

Lessig is currently considered politically liberal. As a law clerk, however, he worked for both Judge Richard Posner and Justice Antonin Scalia, two influential conservative judges.

Lessig has emphasized in interviews that his philosophy experience at Cambridge radically changed his values and career path. Previously, he had held strong conservative or libertarian political views, desired a career in business, was a highly active member of Teenage Republicans, served as the Youth Governor for Pennsylvania through the YMCA Youth and Government program[14] in 1978, and almost pursued a Republican political career.

What was intended to be a year abroad at Cambridge, convinced him instead to stay another two years to complete a graduate degree in philosophy and develop his changed political values. During this time, he also traveled in the Eastern Bloc, where he acquired a lifelong interest in Eastern European law and politics.

Lessig refuses to embrace conventional libertarianism. While he remains skeptical of government intervention, he favors regulation by calling himself “a constitutionalist.” In his blog, Lessig came out in favor of then Democratic primary candidate Barack Obama, citing the transformative nature of the Obama campaign as one of his chief reasons. On one occasion, Lessig also commended the John McCain campaign for discussing fair use rights in a letter to YouTube where it took issue with YouTube for indulging overreaching copyright claims leading to the removal of various campaign videos.[15]

In a speech in 2011, Lessig revealed that he was disappointed with Obama’s performance in office, criticizing it as a “betrayal”, and he criticized the president for using “the (Hillary) Clinton playbook”.[16] Lessig has called for state governments to call for a national constitutional convention,[17] and that the convention be populated by a “random proportional selection of citizens” which he suggested would work effectively. He said “politics is a rare sport where the amateur is better than the professional.”[17]

In 2013 he was an attendee of the 61st Conference of the Bilderberg Group, which took place in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, on 6–9 June.[18]

At the iCommons iSummit 07, Lessig announced that he will stop focusing his attention on copyright and related matters and will work on political corruption instead.[19] This new work may be partially facilitated through his wiki, Lessig Wiki, which he has encouraged the public to use to document cases of corruption.[20] Lessig criticized the revolving door phenomenon in which legislators and staffers leave office to become lobbyists and have become beholden to special interests.[21]

In February 2008, a Facebook group formed by law professor John Palfrey encouraged him to run for Congress from California’s 12th congressional district, the seat vacated by the death of U.S. Representative Tom Lantos.[22] Later that month, after forming an “exploratory project”, he decided not to run for the vacant seat.[23]

Despite having decided to forgo running for Congress himself, Lessig remained interested in attempting to change Congress to reduce corruption.[23] To this end, he worked with political consultant Joe Trippi to launch a web based project called “Change Congress”.[24] In a press conference on March 20, 2008, Lessig explained that he hoped the Change Congress website would help provide technological tools voters could use to hold their representatives accountable and reduce the influence of money on politics.[25] He is a board member of MAPLight.org, a nonprofit research group illuminating the connection between money and politics.

Lessig has known president Barack Obama since their days of both teaching law at the University of Chicago, and had been mentioned as a candidate to head the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates the telecommunications industry.[26]

At his talk at the 2009 Aspen Ideas Festival, Professor Lessig talked about Forbin Problems in a talk entitled Will Technology Change Our Lives?[27] and also about his idea that the American public has lost faith in the central institution of our democracy, Congress.[28]

In 2010, Lessig began to organize for a national constitutional convention.[29] He co-founded Fix Congress First! with Joe Trippi.[30] Lessig called for a convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution[31] in a September 24–25, 2011, conference co-chaired by the Tea Party Patriots’ national coordinator,[32] in Lessig’s October 5, 2011, book, Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—and a Plan to Stop It,[33] and at the Occupy protest in Washington, DC.[34] Reporter Dan Froomkin said the book offers a manifesto for the Occupy Wall Street protestors, focusing on the core problem of corruption in both political parties and their elections.[35] Lessig’s initial constitutional amendment would allow legislatures to limit political contributions from non-citizens, including corporations, anonymous organizations, and foreign nationals, and he also supports public campaign financing and electoral college reform to establish the one person, one vote principle.[36]

Change Congress, founded by Lessig and Joe Trippi, the Fix Congress First project, and the Rootstrikers project were created to help volunteers to address the problem of money in politics.[37][38] In November 2011, Lessig announced all three projects would become part of the United Republic organization, along with Dylan Ratigan’s Get Money Out campaign.[39][40]

From January 11th until January 24th, 2014, Larry Lessig and many others, like New York activist Jeff Kurzon, marched from Dixville Notch, NH to Nashua NH (a 185 mile march) to promote the idea of tackling “The Systemic Corruption in Washington.” He chose this language over calling it “Campaign Finance Reform,” stating that “Saying we need campaign finance reform is like referring to an alcoholic as someone who has a liquid intake problem.” The walk was to continue the work of NH Native Doris “Granny D” Haddock. The NH Rebellion will march again on July 4 and 5.

In computer science, “code” typically refers to the text of a computer program (the source code). In law, “code” can refer to the texts that constitute statutory law. In his 1999 book Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Lessig explores the ways in which code in both senses can be instruments for social control, leading to his dictum that “Code is law.” Lessig later updated his work in order to keep up with the prevailing views of the time and released the book as Code: Version 2.0 in December 2006.

Despite presenting an anti-regulatory standpoint in many fora, Lessig still sees the need for legislative enforcement of copyright. He has called for limiting copyright terms for creative professionals to five years, but believes that creative professionals’ work, many of them independent, would become more easily and quickly available if bureaucratic procedure were introduced to renew trademarks for up to 75 years after this five-year term. [41] Lessig has repeatedly taken a stance that privatization through legislation like that seen in the 1980s in the UK with British Telecommunications is not the best way to help the Internet grow. He said, “When government disappears, it’s not as if paradise will take its place. When governments are gone, other interests will take their place,” “My claim is that we should focus on the values of liberty. If there is not government to insist on those values, then who?” “The single unifying force should be that we govern ourselves.” [42]

In 2002, Lessig received the Award for the Advancement of Free Software from the Free Software Foundation (FSF), and on March 28, 2004 he was elected to the FSF’s Board of Directors.[43] In 2006, Lessig was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[44] Lessig is also a well-known critic of copyright term extensions.

He proposed the concept of “Free Culture”.[45] He also supports free software and open spectrum.[46] At his Free Culture keynote at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention 2002, a few minutes of his speech was about software patents,[47] which he views as a rising threat to both free/open source software and innovation.

In March 2006, Lessig joined the board of advisors of the Digital Universe project.[48] A few months later, Lessig gave a talk on the ethics of the Free Culture Movement at the 2006 Wikimania conference. In December 2006, his lecture On Free, and the Differences between Culture and Code was one of the highlights at 23C3 Who can you trust?.[49]

Lessig claimed in 2009 that, because 70% of young people obtain digital information from illegal sources, the law should be changed.[50]

In a foreword to the Freesouls book project, Lessig makes an argument in favor of amateur artists in the world of digital technologies: “there is a different class of amateur creators that digital technologies have… enabled, and a different kind of creativity has emerged as a consequence.”[51]

In 2014, Lessig received Lifetime Achievement at the 2014 Webby Awards as cofounder of Creative Commons.[52]

Lessig has long been known to be a supporter of Net Neutrality. In 2006, he testified before the US Senate that he believed Congress should ratify Michael Powell’s four Internet freedoms and add a restriction to access-tiering, i.e. he does not believe content providers should be charged different amounts. The reason is that the Internet, under the neutral end-to-end design is an invaluable platform for innovation, and the economic benefit of innovation would be threatened if large corporations could purchase faster service to the detriment of newer companies with less capital. However, Lessig has supported the idea of allowing ISPs to give consumers the option of different tiers of service at different prices. He was reported on CBC News as saying that he has always been in favour of allowing internet providers to charge differently for consumer access at different speeds. He said, “Now, no doubt, my position might be wrong. Some friends in the network neutrality movement as well as some scholars believe it is wrong—that it doesn’t go far enough. But the suggestion that the position is ‘recent’ is baseless. If I’m wrong, I’ve always been wrong.” [53]

In May 2005, it was revealed that Lessig had experienced sexual abuse by the director at the American Boychoir School which he had attended as an adolescent.[54] Lessig reached a settlement with the school in the past, under confidential terms. He revealed his experiences in the course of representing another student victim, John Hardwicke, in court.[55] In August 2006, he succeeded in persuading the New Jersey Supreme Court to restrict the scope of immunity radically, which had protected nonprofits that failed to prevent sexual abuse from legal liability.[56]

Lessig’s political opinions on copyright law have led to legal challenges where he has attempted to put them into action without legislative change. In March 2003, he acknowledged severe disappointment with his Supreme Court defeat in the Eldred copyright-extension case, where he unsuccessfully tried to convince Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who has sympathies for de-regulation, to back his “market-based” approach to intellectual property regulation.[60]

In August 2013, Lawrence Lessig brought suit against Liberation Music PTY Ltd., after Liberation issued a takedown notice of one of Lessig’s lectures on YouTube which had used the song “Lisztomania” by the band Phoenix, whom Liberation Music represents.[61][62] Lessig sought damages under section 512(f) of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which holds parties liable for misrepresentations of infringement or removal of material.[63] Lessig was represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Jones Day.[64] In February 2014 the case ended with a settlement in which Liberation Music admitted wrongdoing in issuing the takedown notice, issued an apology, and paid a confidential sum in compensation.[65][66]

Lessig is married to Bettina Neuefeind, and is the father of three children (Willem, Teo, and Tess).[71]

Lessig was portrayed by Christopher Lloyd in “The Wake Up Call”, the February 9, 2005 episode of The West Wing.[72]

Uncategorized

Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence “Larry” Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic and political activist. He is a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark, and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications, and he has called for state-based activism to promote substantive reform of government with a Second Constitutional Convention.[1] In May 2014, he launched a crowd-funded political action committee which he termed Mayday PAC with the purpose of electing candidates to Congress who would pass campaign finance reform.[2]

Lessig is director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and a professor of law at Harvard Law School. Previously, he was a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of the Center for Internet and Society. Lessig is a founding board member of Creative Commons and the founder of Rootstrikers, and is on the board of MapLight.[3] He is on the advisory boards of the Democracy Café,[4] Sunlight Foundation[5] and Americans Elect.[6] He is a former board member of the Free Software Foundation, Software Freedom Law Center and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.[7]

Born in Rapid City, South Dakota, Lessig grew up in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and earned a B.A. in Economics and a B.S. in Management (Wharton School) from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Cambridge (Trinity) in England, and a Juris Doctor from Yale Law School in 1989. After graduating from law school, he clerked for a year for Judge Richard Posner, at the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, Illinois, and another year for Justice Antonin Scalia at the Supreme Court.[8]

Lessig started his academic career at the University of Chicago Law School, where he was Professor from 1991 to 1997. From 1997 to 2000, he was at Harvard Law School, holding for a year the chair of Berkman Professor of Law, affiliated with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.[8] He subsequently joined Stanford Law School, where he established the school’s Center for Internet and Society.[9]

Lessig returned to Harvard in December 2008 as Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.[10] In 2013, Lessig was appointed as the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership; his chair lecture was titled “Aaron’s Laws: Law and Justice in a Digital Age.”[11][12] In 2013, Lessig was also awarded an honorary doctorate by the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lund University, Sweden.[13]

Lessig is currently considered politically liberal. As a law clerk, however, he worked for both Judge Richard Posner and Justice Antonin Scalia, two influential conservative judges.

Lessig has emphasized in interviews that his philosophy experience at Cambridge radically changed his values and career path. Previously, he had held strong conservative or libertarian political views, desired a career in business, was a highly active member of Teenage Republicans, served as the Youth Governor for Pennsylvania through the YMCA Youth and Government program[14] in 1978, and almost pursued a Republican political career.

What was intended to be a year abroad at Cambridge, convinced him instead to stay another two years to complete a graduate degree in philosophy and develop his changed political values. During this time, he also traveled in the Eastern Bloc, where he acquired a lifelong interest in Eastern European law and politics.

Lessig refuses to embrace conventional libertarianism. While he remains skeptical of government intervention, he favors regulation by calling himself “a constitutionalist.” In his blog, Lessig came out in favor of then Democratic primary candidate Barack Obama, citing the transformative nature of the Obama campaign as one of his chief reasons. On one occasion, Lessig also commended the John McCain campaign for discussing fair use rights in a letter to YouTube where it took issue with YouTube for indulging overreaching copyright claims leading to the removal of various campaign videos.[15]

In a speech in 2011, Lessig revealed that he was disappointed with Obama’s performance in office, criticizing it as a “betrayal”, and he criticized the president for using “the (Hillary) Clinton playbook”.[16] Lessig has called for state governments to call for a national constitutional convention,[17] and that the convention be populated by a “random proportional selection of citizens” which he suggested would work effectively. He said “politics is a rare sport where the amateur is better than the professional.”[17]

In 2013 he was an attendee of the 61st Conference of the Bilderberg Group, which took place in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, on 6–9 June.[18]

At the iCommons iSummit 07, Lessig announced that he will stop focusing his attention on copyright and related matters and will work on political corruption instead.[19] This new work may be partially facilitated through his wiki, Lessig Wiki, which he has encouraged the public to use to document cases of corruption.[20] Lessig criticized the revolving door phenomenon in which legislators and staffers leave office to become lobbyists and have become beholden to special interests.[21]

In February 2008, a Facebook group formed by law professor John Palfrey encouraged him to run for Congress from California’s 12th congressional district, the seat vacated by the death of U.S. Representative Tom Lantos.[22] Later that month, after forming an “exploratory project”, he decided not to run for the vacant seat.[23]

Despite having decided to forgo running for Congress himself, Lessig remained interested in attempting to change Congress to reduce corruption.[23] To this end, he worked with political consultant Joe Trippi to launch a web based project called “Change Congress”.[24] In a press conference on March 20, 2008, Lessig explained that he hoped the Change Congress website would help provide technological tools voters could use to hold their representatives accountable and reduce the influence of money on politics.[25] He is a board member of MAPLight.org, a nonprofit research group illuminating the connection between money and politics.

Lessig has known president Barack Obama since their days of both teaching law at the University of Chicago, and had been mentioned as a candidate to head the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates the telecommunications industry.[26]

At his talk at the 2009 Aspen Ideas Festival, Professor Lessig talked about Forbin Problems in a talk entitled Will Technology Change Our Lives?[27] and also about his idea that the American public has lost faith in the central institution of our democracy, Congress.[28]

In 2010, Lessig began to organize for a national constitutional convention.[29] He co-founded Fix Congress First! with Joe Trippi.[30] Lessig called for a convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution[31] in a September 24–25, 2011, conference co-chaired by the Tea Party Patriots’ national coordinator,[32] in Lessig’s October 5, 2011, book, Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—and a Plan to Stop It,[33] and at the Occupy protest in Washington, DC.[34] Reporter Dan Froomkin said the book offers a manifesto for the Occupy Wall Street protestors, focusing on the core problem of corruption in both political parties and their elections.[35] Lessig’s initial constitutional amendment would allow legislatures to limit political contributions from non-citizens, including corporations, anonymous organizations, and foreign nationals, and he also supports public campaign financing and electoral college reform to establish the one person, one vote principle.[36]

Change Congress, founded by Lessig and Joe Trippi, the Fix Congress First project, and the Rootstrikers project were created to help volunteers to address the problem of money in politics.[37][38] In November 2011, Lessig announced all three projects would become part of the United Republic organization, along with Dylan Ratigan’s Get Money Out campaign.[39][40]

From January 11th until January 24th, 2014, Larry Lessig and many others, like New York activist Jeff Kurzon, marched from Dixville Notch, NH to Nashua NH (a 185 mile march) to promote the idea of tackling “The Systemic Corruption in Washington.” He chose this language over calling it “Campaign Finance Reform,” stating that “Saying we need campaign finance reform is like referring to an alcoholic as someone who has a liquid intake problem.” The walk was to continue the work of NH Native Doris “Granny D” Haddock. The NH Rebellion will march again on July 4 and 5.

In computer science, “code” typically refers to the text of a computer program (the source code). In law, “code” can refer to the texts that constitute statutory law. In his 1999 book Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Lessig explores the ways in which code in both senses can be instruments for social control, leading to his dictum that “Code is law.” Lessig later updated his work in order to keep up with the prevailing views of the time and released the book as Code: Version 2.0 in December 2006.

Despite presenting an anti-regulatory standpoint in many fora, Lessig still sees the need for legislative enforcement of copyright. He has called for limiting copyright terms for creative professionals to five years, but believes that creative professionals’ work, many of them independent, would become more easily and quickly available if bureaucratic procedure were introduced to renew trademarks for up to 75 years after this five-year term. [41] Lessig has repeatedly taken a stance that privatization through legislation like that seen in the 1980s in the UK with British Telecommunications is not the best way to help the Internet grow. He said, “When government disappears, it’s not as if paradise will take its place. When governments are gone, other interests will take their place,” “My claim is that we should focus on the values of liberty. If there is not government to insist on those values, then who?” “The single unifying force should be that we govern ourselves.” [42]

In 2002, Lessig received the Award for the Advancement of Free Software from the Free Software Foundation (FSF), and on March 28, 2004 he was elected to the FSF’s Board of Directors.[43] In 2006, Lessig was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[44] Lessig is also a well-known critic of copyright term extensions.

He proposed the concept of “Free Culture”.[45] He also supports free software and open spectrum.[46] At his Free Culture keynote at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention 2002, a few minutes of his speech was about software patents,[47] which he views as a rising threat to both free/open source software and innovation.

In March 2006, Lessig joined the board of advisors of the Digital Universe project.[48] A few months later, Lessig gave a talk on the ethics of the Free Culture Movement at the 2006 Wikimania conference. In December 2006, his lecture On Free, and the Differences between Culture and Code was one of the highlights at 23C3 Who can you trust?.[49]

Lessig claimed in 2009 that, because 70% of young people obtain digital information from illegal sources, the law should be changed.[50]

In a foreword to the Freesouls book project, Lessig makes an argument in favor of amateur artists in the world of digital technologies: “there is a different class of amateur creators that digital technologies have… enabled, and a different kind of creativity has emerged as a consequence.”[51]

In 2014, Lessig received Lifetime Achievement at the 2014 Webby Awards as cofounder of Creative Commons.[52]

Lessig has long been known to be a supporter of Net Neutrality. In 2006, he testified before the US Senate that he believed Congress should ratify Michael Powell’s four Internet freedoms and add a restriction to access-tiering, i.e. he does not believe content providers should be charged different amounts. The reason is that the Internet, under the neutral end-to-end design is an invaluable platform for innovation, and the economic benefit of innovation would be threatened if large corporations could purchase faster service to the detriment of newer companies with less capital. However, Lessig has supported the idea of allowing ISPs to give consumers the option of different tiers of service at different prices. He was reported on CBC News as saying that he has always been in favour of allowing internet providers to charge differently for consumer access at different speeds. He said, “Now, no doubt, my position might be wrong. Some friends in the network neutrality movement as well as some scholars believe it is wrong—that it doesn’t go far enough. But the suggestion that the position is ‘recent’ is baseless. If I’m wrong, I’ve always been wrong.” [53]

In May 2005, it was revealed that Lessig had experienced sexual abuse by the director at the American Boychoir School which he had attended as an adolescent.[54] Lessig reached a settlement with the school in the past, under confidential terms. He revealed his experiences in the course of representing another student victim, John Hardwicke, in court.[55] In August 2006, he succeeded in persuading the New Jersey Supreme Court to restrict the scope of immunity radically, which had protected nonprofits that failed to prevent sexual abuse from legal liability.[56]

Lessig’s political opinions on copyright law have led to legal challenges where he has attempted to put them into action without legislative change. In March 2003, he acknowledged severe disappointment with his Supreme Court defeat in the Eldred copyright-extension case, where he unsuccessfully tried to convince Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who has sympathies for de-regulation, to back his “market-based” approach to intellectual property regulation.[60]

In August 2013, Lawrence Lessig brought suit against Liberation Music PTY Ltd., after Liberation issued a takedown notice of one of Lessig’s lectures on YouTube which had used the song “Lisztomania” by the band Phoenix, whom Liberation Music represents.[61][62] Lessig sought damages under section 512(f) of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which holds parties liable for misrepresentations of infringement or removal of material.[63] Lessig was represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Jones Day.[64] In February 2014 the case ended with a settlement in which Liberation Music admitted wrongdoing in issuing the takedown notice, issued an apology, and paid a confidential sum in compensation.[65][66]

Lessig is married to Bettina Neuefeind, and is the father of three children (Willem, Teo, and Tess).[71]

Lessig was portrayed by Christopher Lloyd in “The Wake Up Call”, the February 9, 2005 episode of The West Wing.[72]

Uncategorized

Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence “Larry” Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic and political activist. He is a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark, and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications, and he has called for state-based activism to promote substantive reform of government with a Second Constitutional Convention.[1] In May 2014, he launched a crowd-funded political action committee which he termed Mayday PAC with the purpose of electing candidates to Congress who would pass campaign finance reform.[2]

Lessig is director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and a professor of law at Harvard Law School. Previously, he was a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of the Center for Internet and Society. Lessig is a founding board member of Creative Commons and the founder of Rootstrikers, and is on the board of MapLight.[3] He is on the advisory boards of the Democracy Café,[4] Sunlight Foundation[5] and Americans Elect.[6] He is a former board member of the Free Software Foundation, Software Freedom Law Center and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.[7]

Born in Rapid City, South Dakota, Lessig grew up in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and earned a B.A. in Economics and a B.S. in Management (Wharton School) from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Cambridge (Trinity) in England, and a Juris Doctor from Yale Law School in 1989. After graduating from law school, he clerked for a year for Judge Richard Posner, at the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, Illinois, and another year for Justice Antonin Scalia at the Supreme Court.[8]

Lessig started his academic career at the University of Chicago Law School, where he was Professor from 1991 to 1997. From 1997 to 2000, he was at Harvard Law School, holding for a year the chair of Berkman Professor of Law, affiliated with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.[8] He subsequently joined Stanford Law School, where he established the school’s Center for Internet and Society.[9]

Lessig returned to Harvard in December 2008 as Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.[10] In 2013, Lessig was appointed as the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership; his chair lecture was titled “Aaron’s Laws: Law and Justice in a Digital Age.”[11][12] In 2013, Lessig was also awarded an honorary doctorate by the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lund University, Sweden.[13]

Lessig is currently considered politically liberal. As a law clerk, however, he worked for both Judge Richard Posner and Justice Antonin Scalia, two influential conservative judges.

Lessig has emphasized in interviews that his philosophy experience at Cambridge radically changed his values and career path. Previously, he had held strong conservative or libertarian political views, desired a career in business, was a highly active member of Teenage Republicans, served as the Youth Governor for Pennsylvania through the YMCA Youth and Government program[14] in 1978, and almost pursued a Republican political career.

What was intended to be a year abroad at Cambridge, convinced him instead to stay another two years to complete a graduate degree in philosophy and develop his changed political values. During this time, he also traveled in the Eastern Bloc, where he acquired a lifelong interest in Eastern European law and politics.

Lessig refuses to embrace conventional libertarianism. While he remains skeptical of government intervention, he favors regulation by calling himself “a constitutionalist.” In his blog, Lessig came out in favor of then Democratic primary candidate Barack Obama, citing the transformative nature of the Obama campaign as one of his chief reasons. On one occasion, Lessig also commended the John McCain campaign for discussing fair use rights in a letter to YouTube where it took issue with YouTube for indulging overreaching copyright claims leading to the removal of various campaign videos.[15]

In a speech in 2011, Lessig revealed that he was disappointed with Obama’s performance in office, criticizing it as a “betrayal”, and he criticized the president for using “the (Hillary) Clinton playbook”.[16] Lessig has called for state governments to call for a national constitutional convention,[17] and that the convention be populated by a “random proportional selection of citizens” which he suggested would work effectively. He said “politics is a rare sport where the amateur is better than the professional.”[17]

In 2013 he was an attendee of the 61st Conference of the Bilderberg Group, which took place in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, on 6–9 June.[18]

At the iCommons iSummit 07, Lessig announced that he will stop focusing his attention on copyright and related matters and will work on political corruption instead.[19] This new work may be partially facilitated through his wiki, Lessig Wiki, which he has encouraged the public to use to document cases of corruption.[20] Lessig criticized the revolving door phenomenon in which legislators and staffers leave office to become lobbyists and have become beholden to special interests.[21]

In February 2008, a Facebook group formed by law professor John Palfrey encouraged him to run for Congress from California’s 12th congressional district, the seat vacated by the death of U.S. Representative Tom Lantos.[22] Later that month, after forming an “exploratory project”, he decided not to run for the vacant seat.[23]

Despite having decided to forgo running for Congress himself, Lessig remained interested in attempting to change Congress to reduce corruption.[23] To this end, he worked with political consultant Joe Trippi to launch a web based project called “Change Congress”.[24] In a press conference on March 20, 2008, Lessig explained that he hoped the Change Congress website would help provide technological tools voters could use to hold their representatives accountable and reduce the influence of money on politics.[25] He is a board member of MAPLight.org, a nonprofit research group illuminating the connection between money and politics.

Lessig has known president Barack Obama since their days of both teaching law at the University of Chicago, and had been mentioned as a candidate to head the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates the telecommunications industry.[26]

At his talk at the 2009 Aspen Ideas Festival, Professor Lessig talked about Forbin Problems in a talk entitled Will Technology Change Our Lives?[27] and also about his idea that the American public has lost faith in the central institution of our democracy, Congress.[28]

In 2010, Lessig began to organize for a national constitutional convention.[29] He co-founded Fix Congress First! with Joe Trippi.[30] Lessig called for a convention to propose amendments to the United States Constitution[31] in a September 24–25, 2011, conference co-chaired by the Tea Party Patriots’ national coordinator,[32] in Lessig’s October 5, 2011, book, Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—and a Plan to Stop It,[33] and at the Occupy protest in Washington, DC.[34] Reporter Dan Froomkin said the book offers a manifesto for the Occupy Wall Street protestors, focusing on the core problem of corruption in both political parties and their elections.[35] Lessig’s initial constitutional amendment would allow legislatures to limit political contributions from non-citizens, including corporations, anonymous organizations, and foreign nationals, and he also supports public campaign financing and electoral college reform to establish the one person, one vote principle.[36]

Change Congress, founded by Lessig and Joe Trippi, the Fix Congress First project, and the Rootstrikers project were created to help volunteers to address the problem of money in politics.[37][38] In November 2011, Lessig announced all three projects would become part of the United Republic organization, along with Dylan Ratigan’s Get Money Out campaign.[39][40]

From January 11th until January 24th, 2014, Larry Lessig and many others, like New York activist Jeff Kurzon, marched from Dixville Notch, NH to Nashua NH (a 185 mile march) to promote the idea of tackling “The Systemic Corruption in Washington.” He chose this language over calling it “Campaign Finance Reform,” stating that “Saying we need campaign finance reform is like referring to an alcoholic as someone who has a liquid intake problem.” The walk was to continue the work of NH Native Doris “Granny D” Haddock. The NH Rebellion will march again on July 4 and 5.

In computer science, “code” typically refers to the text of a computer program (the source code). In law, “code” can refer to the texts that constitute statutory law. In his 1999 book Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Lessig explores the ways in which code in both senses can be instruments for social control, leading to his dictum that “Code is law.” Lessig later updated his work in order to keep up with the prevailing views of the time and released the book as Code: Version 2.0 in December 2006.

Despite presenting an anti-regulatory standpoint in many fora, Lessig still sees the need for legislative enforcement of copyright. He has called for limiting copyright terms for creative professionals to five years, but believes that creative professionals’ work, many of them independent, would become more easily and quickly available if bureaucratic procedure were introduced to renew trademarks for up to 75 years after this five-year term. [41] Lessig has repeatedly taken a stance that privatization through legislation like that seen in the 1980s in the UK with British Telecommunications is not the best way to help the Internet grow. He said, “When government disappears, it’s not as if paradise will take its place. When governments are gone, other interests will take their place,” “My claim is that we should focus on the values of liberty. If there is not government to insist on those values, then who?” “The single unifying force should be that we govern ourselves.” [42]

In 2002, Lessig received the Award for the Advancement of Free Software from the Free Software Foundation (FSF), and on March 28, 2004 he was elected to the FSF’s Board of Directors.[43] In 2006, Lessig was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[44] Lessig is also a well-known critic of copyright term extensions.

He proposed the concept of “Free Culture”.[45] He also supports free software and open spectrum.[46] At his Free Culture keynote at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention 2002, a few minutes of his speech was about software patents,[47] which he views as a rising threat to both free/open source software and innovation.

In March 2006, Lessig joined the board of advisors of the Digital Universe project.[48] A few months later, Lessig gave a talk on the ethics of the Free Culture Movement at the 2006 Wikimania conference. In December 2006, his lecture On Free, and the Differences between Culture and Code was one of the highlights at 23C3 Who can you trust?.[49]

Lessig claimed in 2009 that, because 70% of young people obtain digital information from illegal sources, the law should be changed.[50]

In a foreword to the Freesouls book project, Lessig makes an argument in favor of amateur artists in the world of digital technologies: “there is a different class of amateur creators that digital technologies have… enabled, and a different kind of creativity has emerged as a consequence.”[51]

In 2014, Lessig received Lifetime Achievement at the 2014 Webby Awards as cofounder of Creative Commons.[52]

Lessig has long been known to be a supporter of Net Neutrality. In 2006, he testified before the US Senate that he believed Congress should ratify Michael Powell’s four Internet freedoms and add a restriction to access-tiering, i.e. he does not believe content providers should be charged different amounts. The reason is that the Internet, under the neutral end-to-end design is an invaluable platform for innovation, and the economic benefit of innovation would be threatened if large corporations could purchase faster service to the detriment of newer companies with less capital. However, Lessig has supported the idea of allowing ISPs to give consumers the option of different tiers of service at different prices. He was reported on CBC News as saying that he has always been in favour of allowing internet providers to charge differently for consumer access at different speeds. He said, “Now, no doubt, my position might be wrong. Some friends in the network neutrality movement as well as some scholars believe it is wrong—that it doesn’t go far enough. But the suggestion that the position is ‘recent’ is baseless. If I’m wrong, I’ve always been wrong.” [53]

In May 2005, it was revealed that Lessig had experienced sexual abuse by the director at the American Boychoir School which he had attended as an adolescent.[54] Lessig reached a settlement with the school in the past, under confidential terms. He revealed his experiences in the course of representing another student victim, John Hardwicke, in court.[55] In August 2006, he succeeded in persuading the New Jersey Supreme Court to restrict the scope of immunity radically, which had protected nonprofits that failed to prevent sexual abuse from legal liability.[56]

Lessig’s political opinions on copyright law have led to legal challenges where he has attempted to put them into action without legislative change. In March 2003, he acknowledged severe disappointment with his Supreme Court defeat in the Eldred copyright-extension case, where he unsuccessfully tried to convince Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who has sympathies for de-regulation, to back his “market-based” approach to intellectual property regulation.[60]

In August 2013, Lawrence Lessig brought suit against Liberation Music PTY Ltd., after Liberation issued a takedown notice of one of Lessig’s lectures on YouTube which had used the song “Lisztomania” by the band Phoenix, whom Liberation Music represents.[61][62] Lessig sought damages under section 512(f) of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which holds parties liable for misrepresentations of infringement or removal of material.[63] Lessig was represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Jones Day.[64] In February 2014 the case ended with a settlement in which Liberation Music admitted wrongdoing in issuing the takedown notice, issued an apology, and paid a confidential sum in compensation.[65][66]

Lessig is married to Bettina Neuefeind, and is the father of three children (Willem, Teo, and Tess).[71]

Lessig was portrayed by Christopher Lloyd in “The Wake Up Call”, the February 9, 2005 episode of The West Wing.[72]

Barbeque Equipment

Cast Iron Griddle Secrets And Insights

Cast iron griddle secrets and insights

by

skemberCast iron griddles

predate history and yet ironically they were still an essential tool in the wagons carried across the plains by the early pioneers of our great country. They remain an important tool in the kitchen armory of the American cook. I know many a cook who, having started to use a cast iron griddle, hardly ever uses their frying pan!

Even with all of today s modern gadgetry cast iron griddles are still extremely popular be it for use on the campfire, in the kitchen or for when cooking on the patio. Isn t it strange how some things just never go out of fashion? No matter what scale of time frame you chose to look at.Cast iron griddles are available in round, square and rectangular shapes and can be used on the grill, on the hob, in the oven, on the stove top and on the camp fire. Cast iron griddles are truly great cookware unsurpassed in their simplicity and their use. Once you ve got used to using one I d go so far as to say that cast iron griddles are hard to live without due to their versatility.

Griddles are perfect for breakfasts as well as for the main meal of the day, indeed for any situation where your food needs cooking with an even heat and

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browning. You can use a griddle for grilling vegetables or hamburgers, for cooking pancakes, oatcakes, crepes, grilled cheese, crumpets, unleavened breads and for Welsh cakes; the list goes on and on.

If you buy a double sided griddles then you ll have two grilling surfaces: typically one side will be ribbed for chicken or steaks and the other flat,so its perfect for pancakes and toasted sandwiches. Always try to chose a griddle with beveled edges as the bevel will help to stop your food falling off when you

are moving it off the heat.

When using a cast iron griddle its important that there is good air flow and that you preheat the griddle pan before starting to place food upon it. Lets make no bones about it, cast iron griddles are excellent to cook with and, if seasoned correctly, they are totally non-stick. Better still, they can be used indoors and outdoors and providing you ve bought a good quality griddle its going to last for generations, by which time it will have attained that gorgeous black hue. Just think of it. Your investment in a griddle is an investment in your great, great, grand children. Now there s a thought. Oh to be there to see them use it?

At the

outdoor cooking equipment

store quality is supremely important to us. We have therefore chosen to sell only the Bayou Classic Cast Iron Griddle range. This is a dream quality griddle: they are made of the very best quality cast iron; they represent great value for money and they will last for generations to come. They come in 3 shapes and sizes: square, round and rectangular, each of which are double sided giving added value and flexibility.

Stephen Kember

is the Proprietor of The

outdoor cooking equipment

Store where you will find a range of exceptional value

cast iron griddles

Get along to the store now as there is a seasonal sale on with some superb offers on cast iron griddles.

Article Source:

ArticleRich.com

Uncategorized

Tortellini

Tortellini are ring-shaped pasta, sometimes also described as “navel shaped”, hence their alternative name of “belly button” (ombelico).[1] They are typically stuffed with a mix of meat (pork loin, prosciutto) or cheese. Originally from the Italian region of Emilia (in particular Bologna and Modena), they are usually served in broth, either of beef, chicken, or both.[2] Tortellini are now commonly found all around the world.

Packed, refrigerated or frozen, tortellini and tortelloni (similar but larger and with vegetable stuffing) appear in many locations around the world, especially where there are large Italian communities. Tortellini and tortelloni are made in special industrial lines supplied all over the world; “fresh” packed tortellini usually have 7 weeks of shelf-life.

The origin of tortellini is obscure although many legends lay claim to the origins of it. A strong local tradition has it that this dish was born in Castelfranco Emilia (province of Modena).[3] One night during a trip, Lucrezia Borgia checked into an inn in the small town and during the night the host became so captivated by Lucrezia’s beauty that he could not resist the urge to peek into her room through the keyhole. The bedroom was lit by only a few candles, and so he could barely see her navel. This pure and innocent vision was enough to send him into an ecstasy that inspired him to create the tortellini that night.

Another distinct but similar in theme legend, originated in medieval Italy and tells how Venus and Jupiter arrived at a tavern on the outskirts of Bologna one night, weary from their involvement in a battle between Modena and Bologna.[3] After much food and drink, they shared a room. The innkeeper, captivated by the two, followed them and peeked through the keyhole. All he could see was Venus’s navel. Spellbound, he rushed to the kitchen and created tortellini in its image.

Finally a third explanation claims that the tortellini reproduce the shape of a turtle in an effort to replicate the famous architectural features of Modena, where many 17th-century buildings allude to the turtle motif.[3]

Tortelloni is pasta in the same shape, but larger, typically 5 g, vs. 2 g for tortellini.[4] Although either can be filled with a wide variety of foods, meat-based filling is less common in tortelloni. Tortellini may be served with sauce or in a broth; tortelloni are rarely served in a broth.

Uncategorized

Talk:Canberrans spend Easter outside: in pictures

I went on a 7km walk around Lake Giniderra today. When I woke up, the prediction on my weather application and looking outside the window was overcast and the possibility of rain. It looked meh. This cleared by early afternoon, with the sun coming out. Hence, the walk. When I started my walk around 1:30pm local time, my weather application on my iPhone said the temperature was 18C. By the time I completed my walk, the weather application said the weather was 21.

In Australia, bearing in mind fall is coming, most shops are closed on Easter. Today was also a parking meter holiday. Westfield Mall was closed, but a few eateries were open including the Light House, Subway, Red Rooster, a Thai place, a Turkish place, two coffee houses that I saw. Zambereros was closed. Two chinese places I walked past were also closed. Traditional Easter fair is seafood and people often go to the beach for the holiday. In canberra, people generally take the long weekend and go to the coast (which is Batesman Bay in many cases).

During my walk around the lake, I saw a number of people engaged in the following activities:

Some of this was in obvious family groups, though there were a number of pairs of people and single peoples. the skate park was mostly kids with few adults there. –LauraHale (talk) 06:10, 31 March 2013 (UTC)

Uncategorized

Talk:Canberrans spend Easter outside: in pictures

I went on a 7km walk around Lake Giniderra today. When I woke up, the prediction on my weather application and looking outside the window was overcast and the possibility of rain. It looked meh. This cleared by early afternoon, with the sun coming out. Hence, the walk. When I started my walk around 1:30pm local time, my weather application on my iPhone said the temperature was 18C. By the time I completed my walk, the weather application said the weather was 21.

In Australia, bearing in mind fall is coming, most shops are closed on Easter. Today was also a parking meter holiday. Westfield Mall was closed, but a few eateries were open including the Light House, Subway, Red Rooster, a Thai place, a Turkish place, two coffee houses that I saw. Zambereros was closed. Two chinese places I walked past were also closed. Traditional Easter fair is seafood and people often go to the beach for the holiday. In canberra, people generally take the long weekend and go to the coast (which is Batesman Bay in many cases).

During my walk around the lake, I saw a number of people engaged in the following activities:

Some of this was in obvious family groups, though there were a number of pairs of people and single peoples. the skate park was mostly kids with few adults there. –LauraHale (talk) 06:10, 31 March 2013 (UTC)